Red Balloons, London T-Shirts and Open Doors: The Experiences of an Oral Examiner

“Look at the following pictures. I would like you to describe them for me please,” I asked as I handed the candidate the photos. As he spoke, I couldn’t help but wonder what I would have said if our positions were reversed. Some pictures are so vague, I actually feel sorry for the test takers. How long and to what extent can you describe a red balloon? The student had already started trembling as I urged him to continue with his description, so as to meet the time restrictions imposed by the university. To his merit, he did quite well as he expanded the description to how the image made him feel.

By Katherine Reilly, Author, Teacher Trainer

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Lifelong Learning and Educators: Do We Really Need to Pursue Further Studies?

By Katherine Reilly, Author, Teacher Trainer

‘Accomplished’ is a word used most often than not to describe fulfillment or the realization of one’s goals. Although the maximum potential reached in any endeavor is clearly of a subjective perspective, the demands of both the current and emerging job markets have become quite challenging, thus rendering further education an essential element to keeping abreast not only in the workplace but in an ever-evolving society. ‘Lifelong Learning’ as it is now widely known, has become a staple in further advancing our own education as well as establishing an even stronger presence in class. Perhaps the most crucial question an educator might ask himself is, “Do I really need to further my studies? I already have a job!”

Click here to read article: ELT NEWS

Originally published by ELT NEWS

How to Use a Semicolon

It may seem like the semicolon is struggling with an identity crisis. It looks like a comma crossed with a period. Maybe that’s why we toss these punctuation marks around like grammatical confetti; we’re confused about how to use them properly. Emma Bryce clarifies best practices for the semi-confusing semicolon. Lesson by Emma Bryce, animation by Karrot Entertainment.